Tag Archives: beetroot

What’s With The Cabbage?

Before Xmas I received an email asking me if I had thought about what we were going to do for Veganuary in the shop (eating vegan food in January) it was from someone called Shane whom I presumed to be Shane Red Strand Coffee. I shot back an answer saying thanks for the idea, that it could be good fun and the next thing we got a box of samples in the post from a different Shane altogether of pretty vegan products!

The Veganuary idea does seem like a good idea  – to detox after Xmas, cut down on emissions by not eating meat and generally save our selves and the planet. And we have a lot of vegetables still growing in our garden.

The warm wet weather has the cabbages shining brightly, the leeks are standing to attention and the green stuff – parsley, spinach and kales are quite happy so there’s plenty for eating.

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Just the thing for a January detox – I have to say although I don’t take detoxes too seriously, I do think it’s good to make a little effort especially after all the feasting.

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My son Darragh came up with this recipe. He was home for Xmas and knocked this up for lunch one day. I had just come in from a walk and was ravenous. I thought this was delicious. The lightly pickled cabbage, grated beetroot, toasted seeds and something else that had a very interesting texture and flavour but wasn’t a vegetable. It was double toasted, shredded tortilla wrap. Highly recommended especially served with tahini sauce.

The recipe will make a large bowlful. Scale the recipe down proportionately if you want less.

Not yet named salad

2tbs olive oil + 50mls for dressing

1 fatty clove garlic

½ small red cabbage

½ sweetheart or york cabbage

1 tsp salt

1 large beetroot

1 bunch parsley – chopped

150g pumpkin seeds

tamari

2 large tortilla wraps

50mls lemon juice

 

Peel the garlic then finely chop – crush in a mortar if you have one – together with a little salt. Mix with 2 tbs olive oil . Leave aside.

Wash and tidy up the cabbage then slice thinly.

Begin slicing from the top of the cabbage, then half way down cut the cabbage in half and remove the stem. Finely slice the remaining cabbage

Put into a large bowl and toss with a teaspoon of salt. Leave the cabbage aside.

Peel and grate the beetroot.

Heat a small frying pan, turn the heat to medium and add the pumpkin seeds. Gently toss or stir until they begin to colour and smell a little toasty. Remove the pan from the heat and sprinkle over soya sauce or tamari. Tip into a bowl and put aside to cool.

Heat a large frying pan then reduce the heat to medium and fry the tortillas, on at a time, cooking each side until it becomes a little toasty (not burnt). Brush the tortillas with the garlic oil and cook briefly once again. Stack the tortillas then roll them into a loose cigar. Cut on the diagonal to make wedge shaped pieces.

Put a clean t-towel on the counter. Put the cabbage handfuls at a time over half of the towl – don’t tip the bowl because all the excess liquid will follow. Fold the t-towel over the cabbage and pat dry then gently roll the towel and pat again . Tip the cabbage into a clean dry bowl.

Add the grated beetroot and chopped parsley.

Drizzle over the olive oil and lemon juice then toss to mix.

Add half of the pumpkin seed and the shredded tortillas then toss again

Tip into a clean bowl and sprinkle pumpkin seeds on top.

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Tahini Sauce

 

Juice 1 lemon

1 clove garlic, peeled and finely chopped

2 big tbs light tahini

a pinch of salt

a little water to thin the sauce

Put all of the ingredients into a bowl except for the water and whisk until amalgamated. Thin with water to achieve a thick pouring consistency.

This salad is best eaten soon after making. Don’t forget to drizzle tahini sauce on top

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Beetroot Scoffins

Our beetroots loved the July rain, revelled in the humidity, didn’t care when the wind was cold and now they are ready to eat. Soldiers, everyone of them and they certainly cheer things up on a rainy day.The beetroot and chia seed muffins I made today were luminous pink. Guaranteed to bring a smile to your face whatever the weather and very easy to make.

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I buzzed some cooked beetroot to a puree, mixed it with yoghurt eggs and coconut oil

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then folded it into the dry ingredients.

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Spooned the mix into a muffin tin and hey presto, thirty minutes later – Pink muffins!!!
They weren’t only good looking, they were delicious.

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I took some to the shop and they flew out the door.

Here’s the recipe if you fancy trying it. It’s gluten free and could be dairy free if you wanted, just swop the yoghurt for soy yoghurt

Beetroot and Chia Seed Scoffins

200g cooked and peeled beetroot
250mls natural yoghurt
140g rice flour
170g coconut flour
1tbs chia seeds
1 and a half tsp baking powder
half tsp baking soda
half tsp salt
2 eggs
150g caster sugar
120mls coconut oil

Pre heat the oven 180c

Put the beetroot into a food processor and puree to a smooth paste.
Add the yoghurt, eggs and coconut oil to the beetroot then buzz everything together.
Put the rice flour, coconut flour, baking powder, bread soda, salt sugar and chia seeds into a large bowl. Pour the beetroot mix on top then mix everything together. Put a paper muffin case in each hole in the muffin tin. Spoon a generous tablespoon of the mix into each muffin case then divi up any left overs.
Bake for 25-30 minutes. Stick a sharp clean dry knife into the centre of one of the muffins to test for doneness. If it comes out clean it’s ready.
Cool before eating.


The Latest and Grated Beetroot Tabbouleh

Our quinoa ( keen-wah) is growing fantastically. It’s an experiment, I’ve never grown it before. It has become very popular recently and has a reputation as a superfood, it’s low in fat/high in protein/gluten-free and has lots of calcium. After reading an article that said all us greedy Westerners eating the quinoa was putting the Bolivians under financial duress I though I should make some effort to see whether it was possible to grow it here. It’s doing well after an initial hit and run by the chickens. The surviving plants look very healthy and flowers/seeds are appearing.

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Of course there are always two sides to every story and I recently met a journalist who had just returned from Bolivia and she told me that the Bolivians are delighted that there’s a market for the quinoa, they just need to grow more to address the shortage. Apparently it grows like a weed so cultivating it isn’t a problem. This makes me happy, as I was feeling a little guilty about all the quinoa that we use.

The quinoa seems to be quite content growing here, but then who wouldn’t after the stunning weather that we have had in July. The real work begins with the harvesting and drying of the plant as there is a bitter coating of saponins on the grains that needs to be removed before consumption. I haven’t got that far yet and am only researching the next step but I’ll keep you posted.

Our latest craze in the shop is Beetroot and Mint Tabbouleh salad. It’s obviously not a true tabbouleh as it’s made with quinoa and not wheat – but it’s a very interesting, and it’s stunning to look at. We have two versions that we make, one where the beetroot is cooked and one where the beetroot is raw. At the moment we’re on the raw beetroot hit. We are have lots of ripe beetroots in our garden, there are three varieties, the standard purple, a golden beet and one that’s called Choggia which is a pink stripy number.

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When they are grated they look beautiful.  Use any young beetroots that you can get your hands on to make this recipe. If you prefer to eat the beetroots cooked, just boil them until tender without peeling them, peel them when cooked and substitute them for the raw ones.

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Beetroot and Mint Tabbouleh

200g Quinoa

300mls water

3-4 beetroots

100g peas – fresh or frozen

1 small cucumber

1 red onion

a large handful of chopped mint

a handful of  chopped parsley

the juice of 1 lemon

1 tsp Dijon vinegar

100mls olive oil

salt and pepper

Put the quinoa and water into a saucepan with a pinch of salt and bring to the boil. Cover with a lid and turn to a low simmer and cook for ten minutes. Take the quinoa off the heat and leave to rest for five minutes then tip the quinoa into a bowl and leave to cool completely.

Put a pot of water to boil and cook the peas for two minutes. Drain and run under cold water then put aside.

Peel the beetroots and grate on the fat side of the grater.

Peel and chop the onion.

Cut the cucumber into quarters lengthwise then chop into an equal sized dice.

Put all the vegetables into a large bowl together with the quinoa and chopped herbs.

Put the Dijon mustard into a small bowl and whisk together with the olive oil and lemon juice then pour this over the salad. Toss everything together and season with salt and pepper to taste.